Author Topic: Green stuff  (Read 2284 times)

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dan-o

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Green stuff
« on: September 21, 2007, 11:19:49 AM »
I have a 55g with 10 assorted Angelfish.  The tank is moderately planted.  Playsand(Lowe's), driftwood, and two 40w flo lights.  I have a heavy growth of what I believe to be a green cayno type of algae.  This stuff grows like a carpet on the plant leaves and bottom.  IT WON"T DIE!  My ph also slowly rises to near 8.0 after repeated adjustments.   I want to stop or control the algae and I can't figure out why the ph rises.  I have never had ph rise in a fresh water tank in all the years that I have kept tanks (slowly going toward acidic is normal)...............................Anyone have any thought on these problems??

Offline davenia7

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Re: Green stuff
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2007, 02:18:00 PM »
blue-green cyano is a PITA, IMHO. 
Try some purigen in the filter and see if that helps.
Also, erythromyacin seems to be the agreed upon method.
But I couldn't help you much with that.
Just heard of it being used since cyano is a bacteria not an algae.
-5 gal. hex salt nano
-20l gal. salt nano
-55 gal. Malawi Cichlid tank
I've recently downsized my tanks because I've been really busy and it was just too much.

Offline monsterpuffer

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Re: Green stuff
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2007, 04:44:37 PM »
The pH rise might be from the sand.  I have the opposite problem with my planted tank with driftwood, the pH drops to 6.5 no matter what.  The driftwood keeps pulling it down. 

Do you add any fertilizers or CO2?  Do you add Flourish Excel?  Whens the last time you changed the lights?  The last time I changed my lights I ended up with a green water problem.  How often do you do a water change?

I personally never buffer a freshwater tank.  The fish will adjust to your tap water pH (it sounds like you buffer).  Where I live the tap water pH is between 7.4 and 7.6; although it can vary.

Have you ever used sand before in a freshwater tank?  It may be preventing detrius from building up and slowly reducing the pH (just a theory).

I've had dark green growth on the top of leaves but it typically grows very slowly and is related to fertilizing incorrectly.  I've never seen what you describe.  Any pictures?

Thanks
Ed


dan-o

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Re: Green stuff
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2007, 06:47:03 PM »
I strongly suspect the "playsand", but I didn't detect any lime or calcium in it by putting some white vinegar on it at the beginning 6 months ago.  The ph started rising about two weeks ago.  I put a large peice of driftwood in about that time also.  The tannic acid in the wood should slowly acidify the water and many aquarists use it for that purpose.  I may remove that piece of wood and see what happens........The sand was in the tank for 6 months and would have reacted near the startup.  I hate the thought of tearing this tank down to get the sand out just to see if it is the culprit.     I also hate using an antibiotic in any tanks, so I was hoping that someone knew of another medication that would kill the suspected green cyano without damaging my plants.

Offline monsterpuffer

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Re: Green stuff
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2007, 08:11:55 PM »
I've heard that overdosing with Flourish Excel sometimes has the effect of killing some algaes.

Offline davenia7

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Re: Green stuff
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2007, 10:12:33 AM »
The playsand is a silica sand, not aragonite... or calcium based... it will not effect your pH... It could grind some impellers... but not change pH... I use it and it's great.

I would say that having a lot of plants in the tank can highly oxygenate the water, which can raise the pH...

I would like to reiterate... blue-green "algae" is not an algae at all.
It is in the family of cyano bacteria... same as "red slime" in SW.
Erythromyacin and/or complete tank break down and bleach is the only known long-term solution.  Though daily WC's and increased tank flow can decrease the amount of "algae".
Good luck.

« Last Edit: September 24, 2007, 10:14:50 AM by davenia7 »
-5 gal. hex salt nano
-20l gal. salt nano
-55 gal. Malawi Cichlid tank
I've recently downsized my tanks because I've been really busy and it was just too much.

dan-o

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Re: Green stuff
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2007, 12:00:36 AM »
Davenia, most media refer to green slimey growth as green algae or blue green algae.  Some of it is actually algae and some of it is bacteria that utilizes chlorophyl (cyno).  Having lots of plants does not necesarilly increase oxy., sometimes it increases the co2.  This cycles from day to night.  Dayly water changes can actually increase algae growth because putting in new water adds new trace elements, water treatement chemicals, and may kill some of the beneficial bacteria leading to ammonia spikes.  Oh, bye the way, where do you buy the playsand you use? 

Offline davenia7

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Re: Green stuff
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2007, 08:20:53 AM »
lowes
it was like $6 for a 40lb. bag...
I do recommend pool filter sand over playsand though... it's not as dirty and the particles are a little bigger, so they don't get sucked into the impellers as easily.
-5 gal. hex salt nano
-20l gal. salt nano
-55 gal. Malawi Cichlid tank
I've recently downsized my tanks because I've been really busy and it was just too much.

dan-o

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Re: Green stuff
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2007, 07:55:45 PM »
I got POed and dumped the mess.  I cleaned everything green away.  Put in brand new play sand (Lowes at $3.50 per 40lb).  Some new plants and a tank that is going to have to cycle all over again.................